The Pivot Blog

The RCMP could be playing a role in the prevalence of fatal overdoses by arresting people at the scene of 911 calls.
Pivot Legal Society, BC Civil Liberties Association, West Coast LEAF, and Community Legal Assistance Society have joined forced to urge the government to enact significant legal and policy reform in favour of marginalized, racialized, and Indigenous communities across British Columbia.
Among the recommendations include expanding BC’s prescription heroin program, reforming punitive and harmful drug laws, and addressing the stigma faced by people who use drugs.
You can refuse to talk to police or answer their questions unless you are in a bar or a cinema, driving a car, or they say you broke the law.
Tenants deserve housing that protects their privacy, safety, and dignity. If police do not have a warrant or other legal basis for entering your residence, you may refuse them entry. You can ask to see the warrant; you can refuse to open your door; and you are not required to invite them in
The BC NDP announced plans to revive the BC Human Rights Commission. British Columbia has been the only province in Canada without a commission since it was dismantled by the Liberals in 2002.
Harm reduction advocates opened Toronto's first "pop-up" safe injection site at Moss Park over the weekend. It was a courageous and compassionate move that will save countless lives in the context of a public health emergency.
NDP leadership candidate Jagmeet Singh is calling for a ban on racial profiling by police. The practice is often known as carding, and the idea would be an important first step in repairing relationships between law enforcement and racialized communities.
The Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act became Canadian law in May 2017 to encourage people to call 911 in the event of an overdose without fear of charge or arrest.1 The Act provides some legal protections for individuals who are at the scene of an overdose when police arrive—whether they are the caller, the person needing medical attention, or another person at the scene. The Act does not provide blanket immunity against all charges.
The Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act became Canadian law in May 2017 to encourage people to call 911 in the event of an overdose without fear of charge or arrest.1 The Act provides some legal protections for individuals who are at the scene of an overdose when police arrive—whether they are the caller, the person needing medical attention, or another person at the scene. The Act does not provide blanket immunity against all charges.
Pivot’s work is grounded in the belief that poverty and social exclusion are not inevitable. Through our campaigns, our team focuses on making the possibility of a more just and compassionate society a reality. Our projects evolve from year to year, but our central mandate, to use legal tools and political advocacy to challenge laws and policies that intensify poverty and social exclusion, remains the same.
Residents of Anita Place homeless encampment in Maple Ridge have filed court proceedings against the Province of British Columbia for leaving them with nowhere to go but the streets.
The City of Vancouver has let yet another SRO hotel fall into disrepair and now vulnerable residents are at risk of losing their homes.