The Case for Heroin-Assisted Treatment in Canada

Heroin-Assisted Treatment, or HAT, is a medical intervention that provides prescription, pharmaceutical-grade diacetylmorphine (heroin) to people with long-term opioid dependency who have not responded to traditional treatments.  It is cost-effective, reduces crime, and promotes individual and public health.  Learn more about why HAT is good for Canada in this booklet we produced for Our public forum on October 30, 2013.

Download "The Case for Heroin-Assisted Treatment in Canada" (pdf, 3MB).

Share

Pivot Legal Society Annual Report 2012

Pivot’s work is grounded in the belief that poverty and social exclusion are not inevitable. Through our campaigns, our team focuses on making the possibility of a more just and compassionate society a reality. Our projects evolve from year to year, but our central mandate, to use legal tools and political advocacy to challenge laws and policies that intensify poverty and social exclusion, remains the same.

Download the Annual Report here

Screen_Shot_2013-07-03_at_3.48.05_PM.png 

Read more
Share

Throwing Away the Keys: The human and social cost of mandatory minimum sentences

Crime rates in Canada are at their lowest point since 1972 yet last year, Canada’s federal government introduced sweeping legislative reforms to our criminal justice system. The stated goal of these expansive and expensive measures is to increase the safety and security of Canadians by getting “tough on crime” and holding offenders accountable.

Download the full report here

notch_new_3.jpg

Read more
Share

Zoned Out: "NIMBYism", addiction services, and municipal governance in British Columbia

A new article by Scott Bernstein and Darcie Bennett, to be published in the International Journal of Drug Policy's special issue "Methadone Mess".  This article discusses restrictive zoning bylaws in Abbotsford, Mission, Coquitlam and Surrey, BC and their impact on access to health care for marginalized drug users.

S09553959.gif

Read more
Share

Know Your Rights with Private Security

The publication of the Know Your Rights with Private Security cards comes after years of conflict between private security guards and marginalized people in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. The cards will help residents better understand their rights and what they can do when their rights have been violated.

security_rights_card.jpg

Read more
Share

BC's Residential Tenancy System- 13 Recommendations for Change


This report was co-authored by a group of legal organization that came together in the lead-up to the 2013 election to develop recommendations to ensure that BC's Residential Tenancy Act achieves its purpose of balancing the rights of tenants and landlords.

The current shortage of affordable housing in BC means that housing is costly and vacancy rates are low. This makes tenants vulnerable, and increases the likelihood that tenants and landlords will find themselves in conflict. In this context, our landlord/tenant legislation needs to contain reasonable protections for tenants. Just as important, the RTB needs to be empowered to effectively administer the legislation.

Download the report.

RTA.png

Read more
Share

Sex Work Rights Cards

The “Know Your Rights” card explains how the VPD’s new Guidelines, which became official policy on January 15, 2013, require officers to prioritize sex workers’ safety over the enforcement of the prostitution laws.  The rights card advises sex workers that the “POLICE SHOULD NOT harass, target, arrest or intimidate you for doing sex work.”

Untitled-2.jpg

Read more
Share

Methadone Rights Cards

In cooperation with BC Association of People on Methadone (BCAPOM), Pivot has produced 15,000 Methadone Patient's Rights cards.  Faced with systemic abuse and discrimination from unethical physicians, pharmacists and others, methadone patients across the province are standing up for their rights.

Share

Annual Report 2011

In 2011 we finished one of the largest internal projects that we have ever worked on and it fundamentally changed our organization. The funny thing about this project is that it happened in spurts, without a clear work plan or timeline. The project was guided by ideas and although there were very few hard costs, it happened with the input of 100s of people and through the work of staff and key volunteers. The final tangible product was a new website (launched in April 2011); however, it is the less tangible shift in organizational culture that is the true victory.    

Read more
Share

Imagining Courts that Work for Women Survivors of Violence

British Columbia’s justice system is at as critical juncture on the path to developing an effective system response to violence against women. With the exception of a small pilot program in Duncan, British Columbia is one of the few jurisdictions in Canada without specialized courts mandated to hear cases involving violence against women in relationships. Vulnerable women in BC have been disproportionately impacted by cuts to legal aid, and BC has been without a Minister for Women’s Equality since that position was eliminated ten years ago.

imagining.jpg

Read more
Share

1  2  3  Next →
I lived the first 21 years of my life in Maple Ridge, an hour east of Vancouver. The first person...
The Supreme Court of Canada’s decision to strike down three of Canada’s harmful prostitution laws marked an incredible moment for...
In 2012, the Safe Streets and Communities Act was passed into law as part of the Conservative government’s tough-on-crime agenda....
Today the Supreme Court of Canada delivered a landmark unanimous decision in the case of Attorney General of Canada v....